To Sell or to Rent? The Perks and Pitfalls of Being a Landlord

Posted in Selling by Kenady Swan 

Electing a full sale or a property management situation is a life-changing decision that shouldn’t be taken lightly. In choosing whether or not becoming a landlord is right for you, there are a number of factors to consider, but primarily they fall into the following three categories: financial analysis, risk, and goals.

 

The financial analysis is probably the easiest of the three to perform.  You will need to assess if you can afford to rent your house. If you consider the likely rental rate, vacancy rate, maintenance, advertising, and management costs, you can arrive at a budget. It is important to both be detailed in your projections and to have enough reserves to cover cash-flow needs if you’re wrong. The vacancy rate will be determined by the price at which you market the property.  Price too high and you’re liable to be left vacant. Should you have applicants, they’ll often be a group that for some reason couldn’t compete for more competitively priced homes. Price too low and you don’t achieve the revenue you should. If you want to try for the higher end of an expected range, understand that the cost may be a vacant month. Any way you slice it, it’s difficult to make up for a vacant month.

 

Consider the other costs renting out your property could accrue. If you have a landscaped or large yard, you will likely need to hire a yard crew to manage the grounds. Other costs could increase when you rent your home, such as homeowner’s insurance and taxes on your property. Depending on tenant turn-over, you may need to paint and deal with maintenance issues more regularly. Renting your home is a decision you need to make with all the financial information in front of you.

 

If your analysis points to some negative cash-flow, that doesn’t necessarily mean renting is the wrong option. That answer needs to be weighed against the pros and cons of alternatives. For instance, how does that compare to marketing the property at the price that would actually sell? Moreover, you’ll need to perform additional economic guesswork about what the future holds in terms of appreciation, inflation, etc. to arrive at an expectation of how long the cash drain would exist.

 

Risk is a bit harder to assess. It’s crucial to understand that if you decide to lease out a home, you are going into business, and every business venture has risks. One of the most obvious ways of mitigating the risk is to hire a management company.  By hiring professionals, you decrease your risk and time spent managing the property (and tenants) yourself.  However, this increases the cost. As you reduce your risk of litigation, you increase your risk of negative cash-flow, and vice versa… it’s a balancing act, and the risk cannot be eliminated; just managed and minimized.

 

 

In considering goals, what do you hope to achieve by renting your property? Are you planning on moving back to your home after a period of time? Will your property investment be a part of your long-term financial planning? Are you relocating or just hoping to wait to sell? These are all great reasons to consider renting your home.

Keep in mind that renting your family home can be emotional. Many homeowners love the unique feel of their homes. It is where their children were raised, and they care more about preserving that feel than maximizing revenue. That’s ok, but it needs to be acknowledged and considered when establishing a correct price and preparing a cash flow analysis. Some owners are so attached to their homes that it may be better for them to “tear off the band-aid quickly” and sell. The alternative of slowly watching over the years as the property becomes an investment instead of a home to them may prove to be more painful than any financial benefit can offset.

 

Before reaching a conclusion, it’s a good idea to familiarize yourself with the landlord-tenant-law specific to your state (and in some cases, separate relevant ordinances in the city and/or county that your property lies within) and to do some market research (i.e. tour other available similar rentals to see if your financial assumptions are in line with the reality of the competition across the street). If you are overwhelmed by this process, or will be living out of the region, seek counsel with a property management professional.  Gaining experience the hard way can be costly. With proper preparation, however, the rewards will be worth it.

Posted on June 5, 2019 at 3:51 pm
Windermere Colorado | Category: Colorado Housing | Tagged , , , , , , , , , , ,

Doing taxes as a new homeowner

The April 15th deadline to file your taxes is less than two weeks away. Worrying that things would be complicated for me as a first-time homebuyer, I had my taxes done this year by a CPA. Here are a few quick tips for fellow new homeowners that I learned from the experience.

Claim the 2009-10 First-time Homebuyer Tax Credit

You could qualify for the up-to-8,000 credit if you bought a home in 2009 or are in contract for your new home on or before April 30, 2010 and have not owned a home three years prior to buying.

    • Don’t e-file. You must file an old-fashioned paper tax return. You can still use online software, just be sure to print and mail all your documents.
    • Make sure the IRS receives your return by mailing it as Certified Mail with a Return Receipt.
    • Include your HUD-1 or Form 540.

Deduct Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI) and Property Taxes
Did you put less than 20% down on your home purchase and are now required to pay PMI? This year, you can deduct that cost.

    • On your tax forms provided by your lender, look for the amount of PMI premiums paid in the last year to add to your Schedule A when filing.
    • All homeowners can also add tax payments of up to $500 for single homeowners or up to $1,000 for married taxpayers  in addition to their standard deduction.

Save those receipts for energy-saving improvements
Receive a credit of 30% of the purchase price for energy-efficient improvements on your primary residence made between January 1, 2009 and December 31, 2010. The maximum credit amount is $1,500 over the two-year period.

    • Qualifying improvements can include: insulation, exterior doors and windows, approved natural gas, propane or oil water heaters.

Because my tax preparation skills are usually limited to answering the yes or no questions on Turbo Tax, please speak with your professional tax preparer or accountant for specific information about these and other tax related questions. Also visit irs.gov for official tax information.

 

Posted on April 1, 2019 at 5:00 am
Windermere Colorado | Category: Blog, Finance | Tagged , ,

Going from homeowner to home seller

Posted in Selling by Windermere Guest Author 
The following post was written by Kathryn Madison, a real estate broker out of the Windermere  Portland-Raleigh Hills office. You can learn more about Kathryn and read more insightful articles on her blog, GoBeyondtheOrdinary.com.

How do we transition from the mindset of a homeowner to a home seller?  Homes bring us shelter, comfort and are a place to express our individuality. But when it’s time to move on, that same home will now be the financial springboard to the next chapter in our lives.

We start by letting go of the home layer by layer.

Both buyer and seller benefit when the seller- perhaps with some judicious coaching from their skilled Realtor- peels away those things that made their home uniquely theirs. In essence, the serious packing begins once the decision has been made to sell; bookcases and closets should only suggest their function with a few items, rather than store seasons and years worth of books and clothes. Carefully removing prized collections and family photos is also vital- nothing should distract the buyer from seeing the house, and seeing themselves in it.

Personal colors are just as important to remove as objects. After all, if you were serving ice cream to a few thousand people (that’s how many will see your house photographed online)- would you serve them mango flavor? It’s a lot more likely you would choose vanilla- and that’s pretty much what the color of your walls should be- neutral or deep neutral tones.

The last touch is a good deep cleaning- ask your REALTORtm if they have the name of a reputable company.

The seller can then replace those familiar objects with a fresh new welcome mat at the front door.

This process allows the buyer the visual and emotional space to move in.

This process allows the seller to move on.

Posted on February 12, 2019 at 5:00 am
Windermere Colorado | Category: Blog, For Sellers | Tagged , ,

How Homeownership Impacts the U.S. Economy

Windermere’s Chief Economist, Matthew Gardner, explains how a strong, stable housing market is critically important to the overall U.S. economy.

Posted on September 4, 2017 at 8:00 am
Windermere Colorado | Category: Economics 101 | Tagged , ,